4 years ago#1
quickjaguare
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..have a co worker that had his cat escape and was immediately hit by vehicle. (injuries appear to be typical of impact trauma) [New Jersey seems to be a DeathZone to all critters]

Cat taken to vet...vet said injuries to leg too severe. Leg amputated. (not sure which leg). Hospital bill $2,000. Cat owner very upset..(cat probably not thrilled either..) Owner knows Im nutz about cats...asks for help. Dont know what to tell him...Hospital bill seems...excessive.. but then Im from New Mexico...everything in New Jersey seems to be priced waaaay too high. Never known a three legged cat...three legged dog..he seemed to do ok..

anyone know prognosis of cat amputees? Can they do ok or no? And is there any chance of getting help with hospital bill? (we all not rich land tycoons like Mr Trump...some of us work in factories, dont ya know...). Anyone know of most 'reasonable ' vet/pet hospitals? I dont begrudge critter doctors making a living...but..gotta find pet care that is affordable too..

any help appreciated.

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4 years ago#2
AngelKalas
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All cat amputees I've known and/or heard of have done just fine. The bill does seem high (even for NJ) but I can't say for sure. Emergency services are usually a heck of a lot more expensive than a 'planned surgery'. Despite a lot of hype a great many vets aren't 'rolling in it', but that thread has been discussed here before and I'm afraid it can be as volitile a discussion as canned vs. dry, indoor vs. outdoor etc.

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4 years ago#3
workonline3792
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My Mom has a three legged cat that does everything a four legged cat can do. Maybe the vet can set up a payment plan.

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4 years ago#4
David Simmons
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Maybe the owner could arrange to divide the bill in half, 50 percent on a credit card (or a loan from a relative) and 50 percent in exchange for working at the animal hospital doing such things as dog walking, receptionist, cleaning cages, feeding animals, assisting employees and doing assorted chores. The animal hospital would get a $1,000 immediately from the credit card company and the owner could slowly pay that balance off over the year(s). The other $1,000 would be paid off as labor. 100 hours at 10 an hour, which would be twelve and a half 8 hour saturdays. This should be agreeable to the vet as at least the $1,000 from the credit card company would be covering the bulk of the costs of the cat's operation.

Hope this helps, Allen C. in Washington, DC

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4 years ago#5
saintdark
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One of my feral kittens was injured and ended up with a badly broken leg. The vet amputated her leg at the hip and aside from walking backwards for a short time when she first was recovering from the amputation she has done very well. She tamed up and was placed in a home after her recovery and her owner says she gets around just great.

Back in October another of the ferals turned up limping. The vet we went to with him thought they could repair his leg instead of amputating it. They went in and chipped away the bone that had formed around the break and set the leg. He had a pin in his leg for about six weeks. He's completely healed now and aside from that leg looking a tiny bit smaller you'd never know he had a problem. That surgery and the followup care that went with it was well over $1000 at a non-emergency vet.

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4 years ago#6
Freebird335
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Very few business owners in the US are willing/able to do these kinds of arrangements because of tax, insurance and other kinds of legal and paperwork hassles.

Joelle If you want to make God laugh, tell him what you are doing tomorrow Father Mike

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4 years ago#7
TrAI
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From what I have seen from Emergency Vets the cats that do end up having a limb amputated have done pretty well.

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